As companies continue to go global and send employees all over the world on short business or extended business trips, and strategically send talent to destinations across the globe for longer durations, how do they know whether any of these travelers are "vulnerable?"

Physically and mentally disabled employees can face significant challenges when traveling. From considering medication availability to accessibility of facilities along the way and in the destination, do your employees have the resources to help navigate their travel and life in their new city? 

Furthermore, as diversity and inclusion becomes a bigger topic within companies, how are these types of travelers being educated and taken care of?

According to the 2017 Deloitte Global Human Capital Trends Report, "As the demand for cross-functional teams continues to rise, mobility will only grow in importance. Study existing patterns of career mobility and begin more aggressive programs, including developmental and rotational assignments and professional development programs." As companies build the "organization of the future," talent mobility will play an even more strategic role in attracting, developing and retaining talent and accomplishing business objectives simultaneously. People can get work done from anywhere, but are they more at risk in certain locations? If they are at risk, your company could be too.

If moving talent globally is a key element to optimizing talent resources, is your mobility program prepared and able to identify and then support your vulnerable talent?